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Anger and numbness in trauma

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Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby bettyboo10 » Mon Jan 14, 2019 6:30 pm

Does anybody else feel like they are completely numb inside most of the time and although you may laugh, talk seemingly as normal, inside is still numbness. The only feeling that 'I feel occasionally is Anger, other than when I am triggered by certain circumstances or nightmares
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Terry E. » Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:26 am

Not abnormal. kind of the normal reaction to dealing with abnormal events.

The comment above anger due to the unfairness of it, can be damn hard to shift. I have to be honest there. Not that productive really. About the best thing it did fro me was make me determined that the events would not define my life. That is more of a long term thing, but yeah how you are feeling, lots here in domestic violence and child abuse would agree with you.

Sorry you went through that, but it looks like you have realised it is up to you how you come out of it.

Good luck with it..

Take care.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Exploring » Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:02 am

Both those things are incredibly common, so much so that they're part of the diagnostic criteria.

In addition to anger about what happened, a more diffuse anger, constant irritability, being quick to anger etc. can also be the result of hyperarousal. PTSD comes with a lot of stress and when your stress levels are consistently high and your body is constantly on high-alert, you're more likely to get angry, get angry more quickly or feel anger disproportionate to what is causing it in that present moment. With PTSD, your body spends a lot of energy on taking in as much information as possible and keeping your body ready to keep you safe so that when it perceives a situation as dangerous, you can protect yourself either by fighting back, fleeing or freezing up. Anger can be the result of that protective mechanism (fight). But all of this is also really exhausting to keep up physically, which in turn makes you more irritable as well. I've noticed I'm much less likely to be irritable or get angry on days or in places that I feel well-rested and safe or in environments that I can oversee or that are familiar and predictable. On a good day, I may even be completely fine in an environment that would usually feel unsafe if I'm feeling positive and relaxed otherwise.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby bettyboo10 » Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:49 am

Thankyou for your posts and I understand what you are saying. Anger does flare up briefly but it doesn't stay for long and it isn't a festering anger, more irritability. I think the majority of time I am on freeze which is the sense of numbness that I feel. I may smile and even have conversations with people, but there is little depth because off the kind of numb/blankness that I feel inside. Trust is out of the window and I can't see that coming back anytime soon.

-- Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:52 am --

Thankyou for your posts and I understand what you are saying. Anger does flare up briefly but it doesn't stay for long and it isn't a festering anger, more irritability. I think the majority of time I am on freeze which is the sense of numbness that I feel. I may smile and even have conversations with people, but there is little depth because off the kind of numb/blankness that I feel inside. Trust is out of the window and I can't see that coming back anytime soon.

-- Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:53 am --

Thankyou for your posts and I understand what you are saying. Anger does flare up briefly but it doesn't stay for long and it isn't a festering anger, more irritability. I think the majority of time I am on freeze which is the sense of numbness that I feel. I may smile and even have conversations with people, but there is little depth because off the kind of numb/blankness that I feel inside. Trust is out of the window and I can't see that coming back anytime soon.

-- Sat Jan 19, 2019 12:53 am --

Thankyou for your posts and I understand what you are saying. Anger does flare up briefly but it doesn't stay for long and it isn't a festering anger, more irritability. I think the majority of time I am on freeze which is the sense of numbness that I feel. I may smile and even have conversations with people, but there is little depth because off the kind of numb/blankness that I feel inside. Trust is out of the window and I can't see that coming back anytime soon.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Terry E. » Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:10 am

bettyboo10 wrote:
I think the majority of time I am on freeze which is the sense of numbness that I feel. I may smile and even have conversations with people, but there is little depth because off the kind of numb/blankness that I feel inside. Trust is out of the window and I can't see that coming back anytime soon.





It may be a kind of disassociation. The "not living in the moment" thing.

and trust is so overrated anyway ..
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Terry E. » Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:13 am

Exploring wrote:
I've noticed I'm much less likely to be irritable or get angry on days or in places that I feel well-rested and safe or in environments that I can oversee or that are familiar and predictable. On a good day, I may even be completely fine in an environment that would usually feel unsafe if I'm feeling positive and relaxed otherwise.




so very, very true. We need to care for ourselves, a little more (maybe a lot) than most
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby bettyboo10 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 4:21 am

Thankyou for your posts.They make sense to me. It is so helpful not to be so alone in all of this anymore, which is how I have been up until now.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Terry E. » Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:07 am

Can I ask something ?

I often feel I have seen behind the curtain and seen a world that it appears few people see.

I guess police see it to but they are not alone with it like us.

It seems to me this is the real world and what others know is unreal, they are just lucky that they never have seen through the cracks.

Just wondering.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby Exploring » Wed Jan 23, 2019 7:43 pm

Terry E. wrote:I often feel I have seen behind the curtain and seen a world that it appears few people see.

I guess police see it to but they are not alone with it like us.

It seems to me this is the real world and what others know is unreal, they are just lucky that they never have seen through the cracks.


I think this is how a lot of people who've experienced trauma feel, especially if the trauma was caused by or could have been prevented by other people. I definitely get how you feel and in a sense I think it's true. Trauma is often life altering in that it can really shake up the way you have always viewed the world or people. There are just some things you don't think about unless / until it happens to you and many of those things are so unpleasant that many people like to pretend they don't happen or could never happen to them anyway. And that can make it feel very lonely and isolating: not only are you left with all the new information and emotions from the trauma and its aftermath, it can also feel like you are completely on your own in dealing with it when the thing you're struggling with is something society at large does not want to see or at least cannot fathom.
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Re: Anger and numbness in trauma

Postby RapidMallard78 » Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:14 am

Anger and numbness, yes I feel both of those. But it seems to lessen over time. I sometimes wonder if the numbness is because the "normal" world just doesn't have that strong impact on me emotionally as the trauma did. Doesn't carry that shock value. Maybe like rocking a canoe on a lake after riding through a hurricane at sea. Just isn't the same. At the same time, some of those situations in the "normal" world will anger me and make my heart race with utter fear. I'm beginning to understand the anger is because I feel threatened or trapped with no way out. Maybe the anger is getting less over time because I'm learning to avoid those particular situations, but they still do occur, and I get blindsided now and then.
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