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Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

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Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

Postby vagabondster » Tue Dec 08, 2015 6:59 pm

Hey guys. One thing that I always found helpful when I was struggling with panic attacks was to stop calling them panic attacks! I know it sounds silly but it actually makes a lot of sense when you think about it. What you’re going through is the fight or flight response, that’s it. If you’re telling yourself that you’re under attack, then of course you’re going to get nervous, that’s what the fight or flight response is for, for dealing with attacks and threats.

Instead, I used to think of them as an adrenaline rushes. A burst of energy that’s triggered because your subconscious mind is perceiving danger, even though there is none. I know it can sound silly but that wording has a huge effect on how you perceive your experience. After taking out the negative inference that the word attack brings, i changed my view of what I was experiencing. I told myself that people pay lots of money for this kind of rush. They jump of building, play extreme sports, chase tornados, whatever. The point is that once I took away a lot of the scariness of it, I actually learned to love that rush of juice and from that point on recovery came pretty quickly.

I hope that you guys found this useful. *mod edit*
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Re: Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

Postby Livia » Sun Dec 20, 2015 5:37 pm

Giving something a name makes it real. Gicing it a scary name, makes it scary. Yeah :)
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Re: Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

Postby Chickcritter4 » Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:53 am

I never thought of it that way but it totally makes sense. It seems like such a minor thing just changing the word you use but it's the little things that make a difference. I know only of my many issues is that I always jump to the negative conclusion or negative side of things which causes me to worry about things that may not even happen or worry about something that wasn't worth worrying over. I think I need to try this. I often panic about the fact that I might have a panic attack, if that makes sense. For example I'm not fond of driving somewhere that isn't close to my house that I've never been to before because I start thinking "well what if I have a panic attack while I'm driving" I'm one of those " what if" thinkers, so I think changing the name might help me out some. Even if you don't use the word attack just the word panic is scary. From now on maybe I will refer to them as "nervous adrenaline rushes" that sounds way more positive and much less frightening than panic attack. Thanks for the advice
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Re: Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

Postby Maya01 » Fri Feb 26, 2016 5:49 am

It makes a lot of sense to me. Probably a better name instead of panic attack it should be somehing like "Unreal fear perception" or something..., because the threat that causes the panic is totally unreal. I keep repeating that to myself when i have had such attacks, which in my case are not often at all... Thanks god! Because we all know how umconfortable this can be.
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Re: Panic Attacks are made worse because of how we describe them

Postby ColouredLeaves » Fri Oct 06, 2017 5:09 am

Amazing. So helpful. I think I'll name mine "surges." Surge of adrenaline, worry and negative thoughts.

*mod edit*
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