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13 yr old with Receptive Expressive Language Disorder

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13 yr old with Receptive Expressive Language Disorder

Postby prowland » Tue Dec 03, 2002 4:14 am

I have a 13 year old son who was diagnosed with Receptive Expressive Language Disorder at the age of 5. After three years (kindergarten, 1st Grade & 2nd Grade) in public schools on an IEP, we placed him in a very traditional curriculum in a Christian School with no special support. As a family we worked very hard to help him overcome his disability and he has done remarkably well. Although his issues are pervasive, he has been a B/ C student for 3,4,5, & 6 grades--again, without IEP support. As he progresses, his reading comprehension issues are becoming harder to overcome. What would you suggest we do to help him better understand what he reads? Are there strategies that are successful for this learning disability? Your help is appreciated.
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Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder

Postby keepsmiling » Fri Feb 14, 2003 12:40 am

I have almost an exact situation going on with my 12 1/2 year old son right now. He, too, was diagnosed early - age 6. He underwent extensive testing at a major children's university hospital, went through IEP (with limited/superficial support) and was released from school support a year later. He is now in 6th grade and his grades are now slipping. Further, his participation in sports is also becoming increasingly difficult for him. Most support is probably coming from "hodge-podge" efforts from both me and the schools. I simply don't know the best approach or WHEN to intervene. I'm confused. After his testing when he was six (which endured for eight months), it took 2years to recover to a level where he believed he could be "normal". I'm fearful of him being labeled. I'm curious (if you happen to read this post) whether you have some good techniques you use to help your son.
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Similar problems

Postby sweetngentle » Fri Feb 28, 2003 12:35 pm

I encountered similar problems with my daughter when she was in school. I had to go the IEP way...her IQ was only 52. The things that I did was to just support her in her difficulies, I used to home school her during the summer months and she like going to various summer day camps when she was young.

Now that she is 21......you would never know she had a problem expressing herself. She goes to a workshop during the day and goes to night school certain nights of the week.

Sweetngentle
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Keep Smiling response

Postby prowland » Sat Mar 08, 2003 9:33 pm

I would encourage you by saying--You DO know when to intervene. You know your son better and love him more than anyone else in the world. The teachers/school system are NOT experts--not on your son, not on educating a child with learning disabilities. You need to know that you are your son's advocate so if you feel that he is not progressing or needs help--you must intervene.
As far as educating our son, we found a cirriculuum that is very traditional in nature--phonics based and "old fashioned" math. We found that in public schools, they were too willing to leave him unchallenged (because he had a disability). We chose a school that works off his strengths--strong memory--and continue to challenge him. He steps up every time we put a new challenge in front of him.
Are you seeing immaturity in your son? How does he relate to others his age? I am sorry I didn't see your message earlier
prowland
 

Receptive Expressive Language Disorder

Postby sweetngentle » Sat Mar 08, 2003 10:04 pm

I agree with Prowland....I think that a mother does know when to intervene. Going up against school officials and testing can be very intimidating....I know that I fought with the school system for my daughter......I finally ended up telling them, "Look, You are not going to get me off your back...so do something here!"

At that point they began to teach my daughter above what they thought she was capable of doing. Meanwhile, at home, I began to teach her to read using the old fashioned way.....phonetics....sounding out words. They were teaching her by word recognition....which was not helping her at all. I also put a few easy and fun games on our pc that in order to play she had to do some reading.....the program progressed according to her skills. She had a lot of fun...and was learning at the same time.

Don't let the school system push you around. I also called different agencies that would help advocate for my daughter.......and I'm happy to say that it paid off.

Hang in there...it's worth it!
:) Sweetngentle
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Postby citrus » Sun Apr 06, 2003 8:29 pm

I also used to have lots of trouble with my comprehesion. your son must be very smart to compensate so well. I would suggest private tutors (if you can afford them) and definetly get him help over the summer even if its you that teaches him. I always found that spending the summer privatly with someoe really helped me out. I wouldnt worry too much about this stuff until he gets to the point where he is doing very pooorly in school though. So far he sounds like he is doing pretty good. Also (if you can afford it) private schools or monessories are great with working with kids who have learning difficulties. I went to a private school for 7 years, it helped me out soooo much.
good luck
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13 year old with REL

Postby keepsmiling » Sat Sep 27, 2003 2:24 pm

THANK YOU Prowland, sweetngentle and Citris. I'm sorry that I haven't checked this forum in a while. I was pleasantly surprised to see the reply posts when I checked today. I am soooo grateful that there are other people out there who have similar situations.

Here's an update: My son auditioned (unbeknowns to me and through his band teacher) for a chance to go to a fine arts camp. He DID it and received a partial scholarship. This past summer - HE WENT and did an AWESOME job! It was at that moment that I realized - he's going to be fine; He's going to still accomplish his goals, if he chooses. This school year, he went out for 7th grade football and feels GREAT about himself...FURTHER, he's currently getting A's and B's. One thing I did was talk to his coach this year and I explained to him that my son has MILD REL . Unfortunately, REL is not known or understood by many. So, I described to him that it's sort of like having "dyslexia" only it includes written language AND spoken language. The coach has been great with that understanding and now all it takes is a "different" approach in communicating with my son. It seems to make ALL the difference in the world and my son seems to be on "cloud 9" with his self-esteem. I have to believe that the message has also circulated around school and that it wasn't just ME that may have contributed to this change. I believe that there are others in the school system that are encouraging him now and working with him to help him be successful. Now, I don't want to say that we don't have our moments...that my son still doesn't say things like, "I couldn't understand what the teacher was saying to me"....or, "the coach had to explain to me '60 times' what the play meant". My son still will occasionally call the microwave the T.V. and he struggles reading a simple birthday card out loud. But, he's hanging in there. Prowland, you had asked me whether he exhibits imaturity. The answer exclusively is "yes". He prefers to hang out with boys that are younger than he and still plays with his legos and "pretend sword fighting" in the back yard....EVEN though he's 13, 6 feet tall and the biggest kid on his 35 member football team. I'm going to go back and re-do my approach with his reading skills and focus on the phonetics again. I've tried the visual learning tools, like learning CD's and DVD's - you're absolutely RIGHT. I like that advice and I thank you all very much for your input. As far as the teachers...each year I take it cautiously. For some reason, I feel that it's best for me to sit back at first in the school year and see what the teachers say to me first. There are some teachers that are understanding an willing to adjust their communication approach ever so slightly to give him a chance to understand their directions. There are some teachers that frankly have told me, "I don't have time"...I then go into LOTS of detail and refer them to the 10-page report in his school file. Which, of course, outlines in detail how individuals working with my son should approach his learning style. I feel like he's on such a FINE line with this because, his REL is MILD. If I allow the school to test him again and again.... his self-esteem goes out the window. He'll be labeled and coddled as if he CAN'T accomplish his goals. Unfortunately, the school system and others will only accept an "all or nothing" on learning differences. I find that unacceptable but, also realize that THAT'S part of living in this world. I want my son to realize that real life will not coddle him, they won't always care about whether he has trouble understanding directions. How will he deal with that? How do we all? Thanks again - I appreciate this opportunity to write about this.
keepsmiling
 

6 yr old, how is he going to learn?

Postby abbottdl » Mon Jun 13, 2005 12:03 am

Hi, i am new and sooooooooo pleased to see that someone else has a child with mixed receptive and expressive language disorder. My son is headed into kindergarten with a shadow we pay $25/hr plus we pay $100/wk for ST we are going to go broke, so afraid to use the public school system, everyone seems to be so unfamiliar with this diagnosis.
Also how do we teach my son stuff like math when everything is sooo verbal. He writes, reads etc but still only has the language and understanding of about a 3 1/2 yr old. We went to Vanderbilt University, Dr. Camarata and he is great with evaluations and such but what should i do with the school situation, i am determined to keep him with typical children. Everyone i talk to seems to think that 2nd or 3rd grade is a pivitol point in these kids lives and special ed classes are our last resort. Any info will help. Thanks
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Postby Guest » Fri Jul 01, 2005 11:09 am

very interesting...ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage
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Postby Guest » Thu Sep 22, 2005 2:22 pm

Wow, I think it is great about how much energy, time, and work everyone in this thread displays with thier child. A word about special education-it is not the special education that you remember as a child. The emphasis is on a least restrictive environment which means that a child must be educated in a setting that is most effective and incorporates an education with children without disability. Most children recieve services in a regular education classroom in all subjects but have the added benefit of a special education teacher to either pull them aside in class or to pull them out in a small group to reinforce or use a different teaching technique to "re-teach" the classroom concents. However, as a parent-you have the final word about what types of services recieve in school.

As for teaching methods probably a visual and memory approach to reading is the most effective. For new words-create flash cards with both the word and a picture of meaning of the word. Repeat the word as your child looks at the flashcard. Also create a block around each letter of the word which helps to remember the shape of the word. For teaching math concepts and calculations-there is a method that is called touch math that works well for addition and subtraction skills. It assigns a dot to points in the number with the number of dots that corresponds to the actual number. Another technique is to use blocks or sticks that represent ones, tens, hundreds, etc. This gives both a malipulative and visual basis for math concepts.
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