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Is perseverance a cure ?

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Is perseverance a cure ?

Postby Andreas82 » Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:45 am

Hello,
I'm still not sure what is my disorder, as in some other post I wrote I mainly have anxiety issues, but also a kind of cycling mood swing in the low end (no highs at all, just normal). I would say the cycle is this stress -> low mood -> anxiety -> tension -> tension release and the cycle starts again.
When I first had my acute episode (severe anxiety, panic attacks, tinnitus and several other neurologic disturbances) after 3 years of emotional abuse (but many traumatic events prior to that) this cycle was very rapid, daily, but as time went by it lasted longer and longer... given the end of cycle with a tension release (usually crying, finding someone to talk to about my fears) it went from a daily basis to every other day, then every week or so... actually, after 2 years, it occurs wvery noe and then, I would say 1-2 months, and it is waaaay more milder than at the beginning (no more panick attacks, not really any neurological disturbance apart from tinnitus which is now mild and still some TMJ issue, anxiety is now more costant but usually mild without a real escalation to a full attack, mood is more stable, kind of dark in some period but doesn't prevent me to live my social life ).
I've read some people say "There is no cure". Well, in a sense it may be right. But my situation didn't improve on its own. I started psychotherapy and mindfulness (thought I should be more costant given the benefits).
Research actually recognize a major role of past traumatic events in developing mood or anxiety issues (chronic), and of course I had tons of them. But there are also several recent researches that support the idea that a long-term psychotherapy, possibly supported by a body-mind practice, can help outgrow those developmental adaptive-maladaptive responses. A large study (I'm at work now I will post it later) reviewed great outcome for an high % of patients with dysthymia following a long period of some sort of psychodynamic therapy.
So, while I know it may not work for everyone the same way, and that not everyone has the time/money to commit to a long (sometime very long) therapy, and that for someone it could not be a complete cure, I really think that research , given the correct approach (therapy and body-mind therapy to rebalance the central nervous system), most people can recover, or at least greatly improve, changing maladaptive responses (both psychologically and neurologically).
I still struggle sometime, and even if I'm actually a bit far from a success story, looking back I can clearly see things are getting way better. Mind that I reached a point where I couldn't almost work and go on in a relationship; i was kind of disable. Also I had many huge fears that don't really seem to bother me anymore (one of them my fear to get in a profound relationship, which meant alot of responsabilities to me, which revealed a deep fear of abandonment).
Can anyone else relate to this and think that research is pointing the right direction ? I know I won't read any post of anyone who recovered (though it is not that hard to find success stories) because they probably don't hang anymore in these kind of forum, but maybe someone shares the same idea.
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Re: Is perseverance a cure ?

Postby quietgirl2538 » Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:41 pm

I don't know much about the research you share about, but I hope someone will share any experience they have had and discuss it with you. :)
“There’s an Asian expression that ‘a burden shared is halved.’"

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Re: Is perseverance a cure ?

Postby abstractinfinity1 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:32 am

Andreas82 wrote:Hello,
I'm still not sure what is my disorder, as in some other post I wrote I mainly have anxiety issues, but also a kind of cycling mood swing in the low end (no highs at all, just normal). I would say the cycle is this stress -> low mood -> anxiety -> tension -> tension release and the cycle starts again.


Interesting. I had a very similar cycle, with different parts to it, but I had emotional release at the end too like you did.

My parts were: stimuli (this could be positive experience too, not just stress, though that too, but yeah, often positive experiences, for a weird reason I couldn't process them as normal for a while, I can now) -> thinking more than usual, obsessive levels, not about any specific issue though, it was thinking about theories on people instead -> over time, more and more weird-ish little emotional moments, not actually lived, "disconnected" in some way instead -> finally, the release, which was actual emotion that I fully lived and I got some concrete conclusion off it, usually about some issue (not positive stuff), and then the whole cycle was ended.


When I first had my acute episode (severe anxiety, panic attacks, tinnitus and several other neurologic disturbances) after 3 years of emotional abuse (but many traumatic events prior to that) this cycle was very rapid, daily, but as time went by it lasted longer and longer...


Same.

One day I was able to remove the "cycle quality" of it and access emotions more directly. It was way more painful too, tho'...


given the end of cycle with a tension release (usually crying, finding someone to talk to about my fears)


Crying I did have too. I could not talk to anyone though about feelings directly because I myself didn't see them. Later I managed to learn to do this a bit.


it went from a daily basis to every other day, then every week or so... actually, after 2 years, it occurs wvery noe and then, I would say 1-2 months, and it is waaaay more milder than at the beginning (no more panick attacks, not really any neurological disturbance apart from tinnitus which is now mild and still some TMJ issue, anxiety is now more costant but usually mild without a real escalation to a full attack, mood is more stable, kind of dark in some period but doesn't prevent me to live my social life ).


What neurological disturbances did you have?

I had perceptual distortions. All that gone, luckily.


I've read some people say "There is no cure". Well, in a sense it may be right. But my situation didn't improve on its own. I started psychotherapy and mindfulness (thought I should be more costant given the benefits).


I don't get the idea behind "mindfulness". It doesn't seem helpful to me. Therapy is ok, but on its own not enough for me.


Research actually recognize a major role of past traumatic events in developing mood or anxiety issues (chronic), and of course I had tons of them. But there are also several recent researches that support the idea that a long-term psychotherapy, possibly supported by a body-mind practice, can help outgrow those developmental adaptive-maladaptive responses. A large study (I'm at work now I will post it later) reviewed great outcome for an high % of patients with dysthymia following a long period of some sort of psychodynamic therapy.


No way I'd ever touch psychodynamic therapy. Maybe it works for others, I run from the sight of it, especially the idea of "free association".

I've only done little bits of schema therapy and the like.


So, while I know it may not work for everyone the same way, and that not everyone has the time/money to commit to a long (sometime very long) therapy, and that for someone it could not be a complete cure, I really think that research , given the correct approach (therapy and body-mind therapy to rebalance the central nervous system), most people can recover, or at least greatly improve, changing maladaptive responses (both psychologically and neurologically).
I still struggle sometime, and even if I'm actually a bit far from a success story, looking back I can clearly see things are getting way better. Mind that I reached a point where I couldn't almost work and go on in a relationship; i was kind of disable. Also I had many huge fears that don't really seem to bother me anymore (one of them my fear to get in a profound relationship, which meant alot of responsabilities to me, which revealed a deep fear of abandonment).


I deeply agree with you here.


Can anyone else relate to this and think that research is pointing the right direction ? I know I won't read any post of anyone who recovered (though it is not that hard to find success stories) because they probably don't hang anymore in these kind of forum, but maybe someone shares the same idea.


I don't know about research, I just know that I personally always believed that it's possible to recover.

I haven't yet, no, but I've got some stuff working, just progress is incredibly slow, lol.


All in all, perseverance on its own isn't enough, you do have to discover the right methods that work for you personally, but yes, perseverance is also very much needed. :idea:
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