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Re: dissociative fugue

Postby keyed » Sun Jun 16, 2013 10:36 am

This describes the collective consciousness (lack of identity) of religious and commercial (corporate these days, people rarely talk about religion anymore) establishments. It existed w out definition other than to corrupt minds and use emotional blackmail to get the general public to do their work for them and 'spread the message'. Witches and Nazis did the same thing. People are easy to manipulate in groups when you can create an illusion of power and influence. (Enforcing control) involves ostracising and drawing negative attention to outliers and threats to the establishment. The civilisations don't change, but the ideas and constructs that change and challenge it (methods to enforce control, assert power and generate fear) are identical. This is a general comment about the ages and its trends, not a specific social construct or time. What are the connections between power, control, identity loss and dissociation. Are power struggles (within and without) about loss of identity and the fragmentation of a cause?
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Re: dissociative fugue

Postby keyed » Tue Jun 18, 2013 6:56 am

(Continued) (Really off topic) The monks (arguably, fugues) in the 13th century encouraged the religious ascetics to starve themselves to death. They would consume nothing for days on end except drops of water, they would also eat things that weren't fit for human consumption (trees, bark, poisonous berries etc) to upset their stomachs, then they would spit it out in disgust. They were obsessed with purity and used religion as an excuse. They said it would bring them closer to God and the saints (not talking about sports). Their hair would fall out (the saints were bald) and they would collapse in a corner due to heart failure or some other health crisis.

They were very isolated (stuck in rooms and often locked up), psychotic and they had prophecies about the future, many claimed they could time travel (some said before they died 'I'll see you in the future and you will be the one in pain', mumbling because they were so starved they could barely talk, and some ascetics would wail and chant all day, it was like a psych ward, crusts of bread would scare them and they would be reduced to an incoherent mess because if they ate them, they'd believe they were failing the Gods), they would sit in the corner and talk to themselves but claim they were carrying on conversations with saints, Gods and spirits http://www.absolut.com/au/. They cut themselves because there was an association made between suffering and spiritual rewards, and throw offspring (dead children) into the fire as sacrifices, the ascetics were raped.

The ascetics had visions and hallucinations (this probably belongs in an eating disorder thread but it is loosely related to identity loss in powerful people and the personality traits of powerful people). It was a power struggle in a society within a religious context where God was used as a weapon to control the masses. Status and recognition (within the hierarchies that existed within the culture- 'every dog has its day') are (and were) incentives or trade offs for the submission TO power. E.g. The aforementioned ascetics were elevated to positions of power but they were powerless in the eyes of the monks and their religious hierarchies. The dead bodies of the ascetics were put in bags and buried under trees. The bones and organs made great compost for the trees. Modern day version? http://www.yates.com.au/products/fertil ... -and-bone/

I think the aforementioned personality disorder was a coping mechanism (and a natural response) because it enabled them to detach from what they were doing to people (being ordered to torture people because the society enabled it and it was normal). I'd be interested to research how personality disorders evolve through history, the cultural origins etc. I think there is a connection between identity loss and power imbalances in relationships- I wonder if relationships between polar opposites (with power struggles within a single identity- relationships between fragmented personality traits, not two or several people) can trigger personality and identity disorders because of trauma. And the dissociation is an internal dislodging of personal power (and the ego) at the mercy of the personal (not collective) subconscious. Can extreme power and powerlessness exist simultaneously within an individual but in conflict, not harmony.
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Re: dissociative fugue

Postby prettysad » Sun Jun 30, 2013 11:05 am

I think Im suffering from a dissociative fugue state. I had a family, my own business and a great social life, although it seems like a different person.5 years ago I just left it all and felt a complete loss of memory. I took on a different character and life completely ,a life far inferior to the life I've had with gross personality changes. I now lock my self away in mass confusion and im very depressed as I cannot do what I was capable of in the past. I even forget how I used to dress myself! Please take this seriously as its very distressing for me and I fear ill never be the person I know as me!!My memory is very vague. Is this normal or should I seek help?
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