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Cognitive Bias

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Cognitive Bias

Postby justonemoreperson » Sat Sep 21, 2019 8:40 am

I was reading this article on cognitive bias and it made me wonder what bias I have when examining my own behaviour. This, in turn led me to wonder if I'm even able to decide how bias affects my behaviour, as it would be active as I tried to reason it through.

What is it?

Basically, it's your brain making assumptions about why things are what they are, increasing the speed of decision making and allowing you to process the vast amount of info that you are presented with every second.

However, as we're all f*cked in the head in our own unique ways, those assumptions are more often than not flawed. Here's a list of the different types and a brief description.

Any thoughts?

Confirmation Bias: This is favoring information that conforms to your existing beliefs and discounting evidence that does not conform.
Availability Heuristic: This is placing greater value on information that comes to your mind quickly. You give greater credence to this information and tend to overestimate the probability and likelihood of similar things happening in the future.
Halo Effect: Your overall impression of a person influences how you feel and think about his or her character. This especially applies to physical attractiveness influencing how you rate their other qualities.
Self-Serving Bias: This is the tendency to blame external forces when bad things happen and give yourself credit when good things happen. When you win a poker hand it is due to your skill at reading the other players and knowing the odds, while when you lose it is due to getting dealt a poor hand.
Attentional Bias: This is the tendency to pay attention to some things while simultaneously ignoring others. When making a decision on which car to buy, you may pay attention to the look and feel of the exterior and interior, but ignore the safety record and gas mileage.
Actor-Observer Bias: This is the tendency to attribute your own actions to external causes while attributing other people's behaviors to internal causes. You attribute your high cholesterol level to genetics while you consider others to have a high level due to poor diet and lack of exercise.
Functional Fixedness: This is the tendency to see objects as only working in a particular way. If you don't have a hammer, you never consider that a big wrench can also be used to drive a nail into the wall. You may think you don't need thumbtacks because you have no corkboard on which to tack things, but not consider their other uses. This could extend to people's functions, such as not realizing a personal assistant has skills to be in a leadership role.
Anchoring Bias: This is the tendency to rely too heavily on the very first piece of information you learn. If you learn the average price for a car is a certain value, you will think any amount below that is a good deal, perhaps not searching for better deals. You can use this bias to set the expectations of others by putting the first information on the table for consideration.
Misinformation Effect: This is the tendency for post-event information to interfere with the memory of the original event. It is easy to have your memory influenced by what you hear about the event from others. Knowledge of this effect has led to a mistrust of eyewitness information.
False Consensus Effect: This is the tendency to overestimate how much other people agree with you.
Optimism Bias: This bias leads you to believe that you are less likely to suffer from misfortune and more likely to attain success than your peers.
The Dunning-Kruger Effect: This is when people believe that they are smarter and more capable than they really are when they can't recognize their own incompetence.

Full article: https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-a- ... as-2794963
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby Squaredonutwheels » Sat Sep 21, 2019 9:15 am

Interesting.

Makes me think that
Seeing as these biases are subconscious; I have a suspicion that by examining my own biases, I could discover the boundaries of what I can emotionally accept and what disturbs me enough to need to warp the experience. Maybe it would work the other way as well. What are the limits of what I can emotionally accept and these will display the outline of my biases.

Of the top of my head I experience all of these biases except for functional fixedness and anchoring bias. Those two not so much for some reason. Maybe because I have really weak boundaries of what individual objects and persons even are.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby saucygirl31 » Sat Sep 21, 2019 1:02 pm

self serving bias is the one that sticks out to me.

apparently im the "king of reframing" things to make them sound good when they're in fact bad to allow myself to repeat the same bad activity. similar concept but I don't think they're necessarily the same.
ur grill saucy.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby cinnamoncookie » Sat Sep 21, 2019 1:42 pm

Everyone has almost all of these biases to some degree on a small scale. Here are some things that stand out to me about you though, for as far as you can tell from a forum, you're welcome,

Confirmation Bias: This is favoring information that conforms to your existing beliefs and discounting evidence that does not conform.

While I don't think you ignore or rationally discount non-conforming information you don't seem to go out of your way to look for it or better understand it other than to improve/test the defense of your existing beliefs. This is an observation made now regardless of if you used to be different - I've noticed the older people get the more they tend to do this anyway. It's necessary but can get in the way of rational thinking because it's so taken for granted.

Availability Heuristic: This is placing greater value on information that comes to your mind quickly. You give greater credence to this information and tend to overestimate the probability and likelihood of similar things happening in the future.

For as far as you give value to the information you share about here and though maybe sometimes you do it as a joke or whatever, I've seen you respond to threads with the same topics differently depending on what other threads there were at the time and what kind of themes and terminology they had in ways that didn't seem planned or conscious. Applying certain information or not depending on the timing. Sometimes you use ideas or parrot the same words/sentence for a while after they appeared then stop using them at some point, for no reason other than it was the first way of verbalizing your thoughts that came to mind. It's like your mind has certain trends and then they get out of style/boring. Everyone does that to some degree but with you it's more pronounced.

Anchoring Bias: This is the tendency to rely too heavily on the very first piece of information you learn. If you learn the average price for a car is a certain value, you will think any amount below that is a good deal, perhaps not searching for better deals. You can use this bias to set the expectations of others by putting the first information on the table for consideration.

You naturally think very chronologically, for better or worse. Maybe not more than average like in the example, which uses "anchors" that were created on purpose, but see Confirmation Bias.

The ones that stand out in that you have them less than average are the Halo Effect, Actor-Observer Bias (ironically), the False Consensus Effect and the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

I've never had the feeling reading your posts and reasoning that "wow, this guy really has a blind spot he needs to check". If anything you seem too obsessed with it, as if logic, introspection and self-awareness by themselves have more power than they actually do or will result in anything more than knowing more. But, besides that it is actually helping or has helped you, I also think you probably just think it's fun or makes you feel good.

As for myself, I have all of them on different levels depending on my mood with moments of clarity inbetween. When I sit down to think about something it's not hard for me to see what's happening. I think.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby ZeroZ » Sat Sep 21, 2019 6:34 pm

I think everyone has all to one extent or another, the most obvious one to me is I tend to rely more on instincts and first impressions than facts. For instance if I get put off initially or I see a certain side of someone I tend to think this is their true character and it becomes very difficult to accept anything different because anyone can pretend to be anything but once I feel like you have revealed your true nature that’s how I process every interaction with the person, until they do something to drastically change my mind.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby Reaper » Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:19 am

These two strongly apply to me. Some others probably do too, but these two the most:

Self-Serving Bias: This is the tendency to blame external forces when bad things happen and give yourself credit when good things happen. When you win a poker hand it is due to your skill at reading the other players and knowing the odds, while when you lose it is due to getting dealt a poor hand.


Attentional Bias: This is the tendency to pay attention to some things while simultaneously ignoring others. When making a decision on which car to buy, you may pay attention to the look and feel of the exterior and interior, but ignore the safety record and gas mileage.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby salles » Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:15 pm

I think i am guilty of all to varying degrees, ( except optimism bias. I have never had that! )
but have become more aware of such 'errors in thinking' as I get older. Especially regarding the halo effect '' Your overall impression of a person influences how you feel and think about his or her character. This especially applies to physical attractiveness influencing how you rate their other qualities.
I am glad to say I have developed a healthy suspicion regarding my own bias, in this regard.

The kind of bias that interests me most is Misinformation Effect: This is the tendency for post-event information to interfere with the memory of the original event. It is easy to have your memory influenced by what you hear about the event from others. Knowledge of this effect has led to a mistrust of eyewitness information.
It is interesting how in spite of knowing this, courts of law still place a high value on witness testimonies. If I was a lawyer I think my first aim would be to dismiss a witness's reliability regarding memory ( if it suited my needs ). Should be easy enough.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby ShaolinMonk » Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:18 pm

Suppose it depends on the eyes of the witness and the tint of the glasses?
When in doubt, find out. Then again, if they are seeking to hide or deflect elsewhere, other means to verify make sense, but not past the point of reason as is the case of the deranged.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby justonemoreperson » Mon Sep 23, 2019 11:59 am

There are a few that I recognise in myself and a couple I don't.

However, this isn't a problem that some people face, this is something that any normal brain does as a matter or course, otherwise it would be spending so much time analysing every single interaction that it would be overwhelming.

So, if you recognise some, it means you're aware of how you're doing it. If you don't recognise some, then it probably means you're not aware of how or when you're doing it, rather than whether or not you are.
I'm not arguing; I'm explaining why I'm right.
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Re: Cognitive Bias

Postby cinnamoncookie » Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:32 pm

Booooooo.
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