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Using a diagnosis as a crutch

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Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby SoloZombie » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:33 pm

I’ve seen it here and other places on the Internet people identify with their disorder or diagnosis to an extent to justify poor behavior. I’m not talking about being unaware or shifting blame unknowingly, I’m talking about being very aware of the behavior and accepting it as inevitable because you have an illness.

Is this an example of how a diagnosis can be a negative influence, an amplifier for someone, such as they can now explain such bizarre behavior because there is a disorder to blame it on now? I’m a firm believer that if you can identify and are aware of something you can try and work it out. We are not physically handicapped, well maybe a few of you are and a few more probably need to wear hockey helmets when you go outside but that’s for a different discussion.

Has being diagnosed helped you to correct unwanted behavior or has it become a crutch for you to justify it?
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby justonemoreperson » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:34 am

I've never found my diagnosis to be of help to me, quite the opposite.

Reluctantly, I accept that there's stuff I find harder, or impossible, to do because of it, but I doubt the accuracy and the understanding of it as it's been pigeon-holed.
I'm not arguing; I'm explaining why I'm right.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby Poisonchocolate » Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:56 pm

I mean, surely there is *some* difference between neurotypical brains and those with a disorder. It would be naive to say that you can just "work out" any problem and be normal afterward.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby easiersaidthandone » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:30 pm

What he said ^

Also, this thread fails to realize some people like who they are, problems and all.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby Manners73 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:48 pm

I know that some of my negative behaviour is down to my diagnosis but I wouldn't use it as an excuse because I'm supposed old enough to be able to control my behaviour but sometimes it does get the better of me.

I reckon I come across as better behaved online than I do in real life so I don't see my behaviour as an issue here anyway.

As easiersaidthandone said some people do like the way they are and so they should do as well otherwise what's the point.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby SoloZombie » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:33 pm

Poisonchocolate wrote:I mean, surely there is *some* difference between neurotypical brains and those with a disorder. It would be naive to say that you can just "work out" any problem and be normal afterward.


I’m sure it is, but that’s not at all what this thread is about. It’s about not working on issues even when you are aware of them. Instead using it as an crutch to explain your behavior. I thought I was pretty clear here.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby SoloZombie » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:44 pm

if someone likes being disordered and spinning their wheels all their life than that’s a different issue. We all know these people the same losers from HS now in their 30s 40s doing the exact same things they did then. At least most of them are unaware
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby easiersaidthandone » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:00 am

Sounds like a projection
I don't fake it, I just make it.
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby SoloZombie » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:11 am

easiersaidthandone wrote:Sounds like a projection


This sounds like projection.

:)
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Re: Using a diagnosis as a crutch

Postby justonemoreperson » Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:42 am

Manners73 wrote:
As easiersaidthandone said some people do like the way they are and so they should do as well otherwise what's the point.


I think it's more a case that people can't see a direction away from the path they're on, and so fall back to common, and comfortable, behaviour.

Some types of PD are caused by a difference in brain structure, and some create brain pathways due to repeated behaviour, but are caused by environmental conditioning.

Take a person who wants to change how they are...what do they do? They have no experience of behaving differently or what sort of day-by-day thought process they need to maintain to deal with the on-going behaviour needed to facilitate change.

You see it in fat people going on a diet. Thin people have habits that cause them to stay thin. They are naturally active and they eat when they're hungry. Fat people don't have these behaviours and so they try to mimic them but focusing on food, deciding how much they can't eat and force themselves to waddle down the street in training shoes.

But once it loses its novelty, they end up sitting in front of Netflix with a bucket of donuts.

PD behaviour is the same. You follow the "rules" of successful living, but because they're unfamiliar and not common habit, it requires dedication to get to a point of habit. However, having a PD reduces your ability to form that habit and so you end up slipping back to the easy and comfortable behaviour you're used to.
I'm not arguing; I'm explaining why I'm right.
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