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Recognizing emotions

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Recognizing emotions

Postby dobiedobiedoo » Sun Jan 27, 2019 9:46 pm

According to several studies Psychopathy is linked to difficulties in recognizing facial expressions of fear or sadness.
According to Hare "“A high-scoring psychopath views the world in a very different way,” says Hare. “It’s like colour-blind people trying to understand the colour red, but in this case ‘red’ is other people’s emotions.”
Do you find the emotional world (not mental) of others hard to comprehend? In your experience, can a wrong interruption of a situation can lead to problems in controlling your behavior?
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby Manners73 » Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:03 pm

Emotions aren't something I really think about very much in other people.

I don't really recognise them in myself...I know I must have them because people tend to tell me to calm down a lot but I don't notice them.

I do try to look at people's faces to see what they are thinking but I've never thought about it as if I'm looking for emotions.

In any case I can't make sense of it.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby ArchCannon » Sun Jan 27, 2019 10:32 pm

I do have problems with recognizing other people's emotional state, I'm positive about this. Especially with sadness. Come to think of it though, I don't often try or care.

And yes it is frustrating, which can lead to impulsive behavior, I guess.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby vcrpamphlet » Mon Jan 28, 2019 1:09 pm

I thought the sentiment was the opposite, that psychopaths are normally skilled with recognising the feelings of others. They just learn it differently. That’s maybe glamourising things a bit, but it surely applies to those with enough intelligence to figure body language - recognising emotions from facial expressions is a myth. The body apparently interprets itself before assigning an appropriate emotional concept, so two people can interpret the same adrenal response as anger or arousal depending on environmental factors. ‘Recognising’ emotions in others quickly and accurately is partly intuitive in the sense it incorporates several data points like tone of voice and physiognomic contrast (to an established normative). If anything it’s enterprising autists and other cluster B extremes that struggle with the subjectivity of it all. You read it on this forum all the time: psychopaths are excellent at cognitive empathy, they’re just deficient in the process of emotional simulation. They know how you feel based solely on the external signature, meaning everything past your surface from their perspective is largely invisible. Your mind may as well not exist, but that doesn’t mean they can’t work out when it moves a certain way.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby solemnlysworn » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:27 pm

psychopaths are excellent at cognitive empathy, they’re just deficient in the process of emotional simulation. They know how you feel based solely on the external signature, meaning everything past your surface from their perspective is largely invisible.


I'm not sure if that is what cognitive and emotional empathy get at. Affective empathy is usually described as an appropriate emotional response to suffering, rather than to mean an inability to simulate somebody else's inner world which is generally a feature of cognitive empathy.

What you describe is how I usually see autism described. Somebody screams in pain so they are obviously hurt. What is going on beyond the objective stimuli is invisible. Apparently, this is different to psychopaths who have a capacity to simulate or intuit the idea of hurt without the outward cues.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby Manners73 » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:53 pm

^^i have to fake some kind of human response if I realise someone is in pain.

I can remember one time I was doing a cleaning job and there was some contractors doing some building work or something.

Anyway I heard some kind of heavy breathing behind me and I turned round to see a man. His face had gone a weird colour and he was holding his wrist in his hand. He was obviously in pain because his bone was sticking out but I couldn't read the pain in his face. To this day I can only recall the colour he had turned and the fact he was breathing funny. I did go to get help obviously.

I find anger a hard one to read. I just used to laugh at people when I was younger if they were shouting and balling at me. I suppose it is funny in a way to drive a grown adult to the point where they are going absolutely sick at a 12 year old girl...I probably did know they were angry at me but the shear velocity of there anger just didn't make sense in my mind so I just would find it so comical that I would get them going even more. But I can just see anger on someone's face...

If I do ever detect emotions on a persons face I think they must be faking it because no one is that exaggerated that they can show emotions on their face unless they are in a soap opera.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby thelivinghell92 » Mon Jan 28, 2019 9:31 pm

I took this test and got 18/20:

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/quizzes/ei_quiz

Really don't know if my high-functioning autism diagnosis is correct because I intuitively knew the emotions of most of those pictures in the test.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby HSS » Tue Jan 29, 2019 3:11 pm

I am quite confused when I read that psychopaths have cognitive empathy because they read body language.
Are you able to "decode" other people's emotional state while you are reading written messages or are on the phone?
I think so... and then I don't understand.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby vcrpamphlet » Wed Jan 30, 2019 1:29 am

solemnlysworn wrote:I'm not sure if that is what cognitive and emotional empathy get at. Affective empathy is usually described as an appropriate emotional response to suffering, rather than to mean an inability to simulate somebody else's inner world which is generally a feature of cognitive empathy.

What you describe is how I usually see autism described. Somebody screams in pain so they are obviously hurt. What is going on beyond the objective stimuli is invisible. Apparently, this is different to psychopaths who have a capacity to simulate or intuit the idea of hurt without the outward cues


I think we’re on similar pages in slightly different contexts. ‘Emotional simulation’ there is technical in the same way the physical world isn’t directly perceived, rather the retina sends signals to the ganglia, etc. Just wrote it that way because there’s sometimes a sense that emotions ‘happen’ to people, like emotional empathy involves invisible emotional plasma having some cross-pollination effect.
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Re: Recognizing emotions

Postby justonemoreperson » Wed Jan 30, 2019 9:30 am

The confusing part of this to me is what makes it prompt a sympathetic response. It's a part of empathy that I still do not really believe; that someone has a reaction to someone else's suffering that is not intuitive.

Take SS's example of the autistic person hearing a scream. They don't tend to have empathy because the scream in itself causes an intense reaction to themselves, and so they're too completely involved in their own response to be able to have an ability to empathise.

Anyone else is able to recognise that a screaming person isn't happy, it's not rocket science. But there's a difference in how people experience it.

For example: a friend recently suffered a major loss. This had a profound effect on my wife; she was sad to an extreme degree and continues to be affected by it.

Personally, I'm not stupid, I knew that it affected the guy seriously and that he was suffering. I was able to work out what I thought he needed and I was able to offer help.

But, I kept forgetting. As days passed and stuff started to go back to normal, I have to be reminded to continue to show care.

This, I believe, is the key difference. What makes this difference?

Empathy is a highly effective tool and one I can't manage to do to the degree that my wife, for example, can. It's probably been one of the major contributors to most of the problems I've caused myself over the years and, as much as a I try to understand it, it's just makes no fundamental sense to me.

What is it?
I'm not arguing; I'm explaining why I'm right.
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