Our partner

Beating a dead horse

Antisocial Personality Disorder message board, open discussion, and online support group.

Moderator: seabreezeblue

Forum rules
Attention Please. You are entering the ASPD forum. Please read this carefully.

Given the unique propensities of those who are faced with the issues of ASPD, topics at times may be uncomfortable for non ASPD readers. Discussions related to violent urges are permitted here, within the context of deeper understanding of the commonalties shared by members. Indulging these urges is not what regular users here are attempting to do.

Conversations here can be triggering for those who have suffered abuse or violent encounters. Respectful questioning is welcome from non ASPD members.

For those who have no respect for either this illness or for those who are living with it, please do not enter this forum. Discrimination of Personality Disorders is not tolerated on this site.

Moderators are present here to ensure that members treat each other with dignity and respect. If topics become overly graphic or drift from having a healthy perspective, moderators will intervene.
Please feel free to contact a moderator if you have any questions or concerns.

Best Regards,
The Team

Beating a dead horse

Postby 010001011010101001 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 7:15 am

Can anyone simplify for me the origin for the popular connection, around here at least, of ASPD with the whole 'dead eye stare' thing - I understand to a degree what that can indicate emotionally or psychologically but I don't see how a particular look in the eye (let alone somebody's subjective perception thereof) can in any way be said to indicate ASPD or add to an existing assumption, surely it can point to so many other things as to be irrelevant, even when on top of existing criteria.
User avatar
010001011010101001
Consumer 1
Consumer 1
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun May 27, 2018 11:25 am
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)


ADVERTISEMENT

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby Autumn218 » Sat Oct 06, 2018 8:20 am

In interviews i have seen contempt and grandiosity and envy in the stare or something similar .
dead maybe of how empty they are of compassion and they see others as objects.
and somewhere it transmits
edit:i think they mean dead as they see a lack of feelings inside
Autumn218
Consumer 5
Consumer 5
 
Posts: 188
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2018 4:05 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby Quoth » Sun Oct 07, 2018 2:46 am

It’s to do with flat affect and the difficulty faking the subtle aspects of emotional expression performed by the muscles around the eyes. Which is not to say I think it has a whole lot of legitimacy.
as if in a broken jug for one backwards moment
water might keep its shape

https://youtu.be/VivuMRzQyw0
User avatar
Quoth
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 1449
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2017 2:03 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby PsychoGenesis » Sun Oct 07, 2018 6:36 am

the human eye only loses in detail for eagles, it can detect micro-expressions and pupil changes at several meters of distance

the way good/bad emotion recognition is processed depends on oxytocin in the brain, which is under-expressed in ASPD

the way each one express it can vary but lets call it a "pessimistic gaze"


first time I noticed it was during an experiment with OXTR/Sigma-1R agonists
my eyes change and people can notice it across the street, people that know me get scared even hahaha
''our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate
our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure''


rs1042778, rs4790904 homozygous ┬┴┬┴┤( ͡° ͜ʖ├┬┴┬┴
User avatar
PsychoGenesis
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 326
Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2018 10:38 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby 010001011010101001 » Sun Oct 07, 2018 7:31 am

Quoth wrote:It’s to do with flat affect and the difficulty faking the subtle aspects of emotional expression performed by the muscles around the eyes.


Yeah of course, but that applies to so many other psychological issues it should be meaningless.

Quoth wrote: Which is not to say I think it has a whole lot of legitimacy.


Yep :mrgreen:

PsychoGenesis wrote:my eyes change and people can notice it across the street, people that know me get scared even hahaha


Oh please.
User avatar
010001011010101001
Consumer 1
Consumer 1
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Sun May 27, 2018 11:25 am
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 9:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby PsychoGenesis » Sun Oct 07, 2018 8:06 am

010001011010101001 wrote:
Quoth wrote:It’s to do with flat affect and the difficulty faking the subtle aspects of emotional expression performed by the muscles around the eyes.


Yeah of course, but that applies to so many other psychological issues it should be meaningless.


you're missing the key point, read my post again
ASPD is not a simple "psychological issue" its a nasty genetic deficit which impacts your whole life

when you get the picture, go ask your psych about jean piaget and what social deficits can do
''our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate
our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure''


rs1042778, rs4790904 homozygous ┬┴┬┴┤( ͡° ͜ʖ├┬┴┬┴
User avatar
PsychoGenesis
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 326
Joined: Tue Sep 18, 2018 10:38 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 6:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby tom556 » Sun Oct 07, 2018 9:13 pm

PsychoGenesis wrote:when you get the picture, go ask your psych about jean piaget and what social deficits can do


Is it the one that basically says that if you haven't been shaped properly as a child, you're pretty much done?
tom556
Consumer 0
Consumer 0
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:34 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 10:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby Cerpyra » Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:47 pm

My guess would be a stereotype marked by lack of social interest/genuine emotional response.

A lot of the time when I don't feel like making eye contact (but realize it's the normal thing to do in a given scenario), I'll look at the space between someone's eyes. Some of my peers are noticeably unnerved by it, but most people don't notice.

Piaget had a lot to say, didn't he?
User avatar
Cerpyra
Consumer 3
Consumer 3
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:04 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 5:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby Squaredonutwheels » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:03 am

Cerpyra wrote: I'll look at the space between someone's eyes. Some of my peers are noticeably unnerved by it, but most people don't notice.

This is funny as I do this as well. When I talk to women I look at their mouths.
My friends all think I'm a stoner because I wear sunglasses even inside. I just do it because I'm to lazy to bother with eye contact, and half the time, my eyes are closed and I grab a quick snooze between conversations.
Squaredonutwheels
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 580
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2018 3:41 pm
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 8:36 pm
Blog: View Blog (10)

Re: Beating a dead horse

Postby LeelaTuranga » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:16 am

if i start thinking were i look i get confused and feel awkward and do not know were to look. too self aware of where i should look.
i have to do it without thinking it.spontaneously, because if i start thinking i get too self aware that confuses me.
looking at mouths it can seen like you want to kiss the other maybe,or was that if you look intensly in the eyes, i forgot.

i start thinking what eye i should look and maybe i should look between the eyes,or should i look at the mouth or to look somewhere else like i am shy.or do i look too intensly?
i do not remember where i look but i remember times that i thought of it and became more confusing/awkward lol
maybe if i look at mouth means he/she has a pretty one
LeelaTuranga
Consumer 5
Consumer 5
 
Posts: 109
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:09 am
Local time: Sat Dec 15, 2018 11:36 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Next

Return to Antisocial Personality Disorder Forum




  • Related articles
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 39 guests