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Victim Impact Statements

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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby Eight » Fri Mar 09, 2018 1:37 am

Pennywise wrote:This offender used his position and power to groom and get to the victims, so even more so would the victims want to tell him off for abusing that, in court.

Yes. He was the team doctor. He molested many girls over many years, and multiple times. He'll spend life in prison now. I bet it felt good to those young women to tell him off for what he did to them when they were girls.

It was interesting to me that after several victims had spoken, and there were many more who were due to speak, he asked the judge to allow him to not be in courtroom to hear the remainder. He used, as his reasoning, that it was a form of cruel and unusual punishment, and that it was making him sick. The judge wasn't having it and told him that he'd be present for every single speaker. Her view, as she stated, was that giving the victims the opportunity to speak out in public was part of the justice being rendered.

It didn't affect his sentence - that was already set per the charges and judging.
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby Pennywise » Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:03 am

Eight, that is interesting, the doctor's reaction asking the court if he could refrain from hearing further statements. And saying they were making him sick.

-- Thu Mar 08, 2018 11:04 pm --

I agree with the judge they are part of justice rendered.
Fear kills more dreams than failure ever will.
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby The_Essentials » Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:40 am

Dulcet wrote: ...

Victim statements in court are a chance for the victims, or families of victims to say "###$ you" and express the impact the crime had on them to the person who attacked or whatevered them. They're a logical part of the justice system, and I think they serve as therapeutic part of the coping process a victim/family of a victim have to go through. It's also important so-far as the whole "Rehabilitation" process goes in that sometimes hearing the actual impact their actions had on their victims can sometimes motivate someone to change their ways. Not always, but sometimes.

To my understanding, victim statements rarely have an impact on the actual outcome of the charges. Most of the time they come after a verdict has been reached.

Any criminal who "Cant handle" hearing the statements of their victims is complete and utter trash in my eyes. If you can't handle the outcome of what you did, you shouldn't have done it. Rapists, murderers, etc. If they can't handle hearing about what their actions did to those they targeted then they're literal trash. They talked the talk, but can't walk the walk. People like that last about 4 days in prison, so there is justice I suppose.

That pathetic Dr. who asked to be excused from hearing the hundreds of girls he raped over the years is just pathetic. Either own what you did and be proud of it, or don't ######6 do it. This half-assed "I did it, but I don't want to be shamed for doing it" crap doesn't cut it with me. It pleases me greatly to think of what his life will be like in gen. pop until he either kills himself, is beaten/raped to death or dies of ripe old age. I hope he lives a long, painful life personally. Give what you get, balance in all things. Equivalent exchange. Karma. Things always balance out. :mrgreen:
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby crystal_richardson_ » Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:20 pm

not everyone who commits crimes as psychopaths. many do feel guilt and regret and things like that. sometimes they are urged by circumstances, like family or something, or maybe pressured into it, and end up doing it impulsively or under duress, something they normally wouldn't, and so end up suffering.

other people have like issues. like re rape, sexual addiction or perversion. lots of addicts feel like sh*t after they indulge. it's not just guilt or even at all. it can be low self worth, lots of things. and they may not be devoid of empathy when the 'fever' of the addiction/impulse settles down, after which point they may regret and loath themselves, etc.

it's not pathetic. that's just reality.

why would it please you greatly for someone who showed genuine regret/remorse/empathy to be beaten/raped/etc in prison?

do you have the same trait of which you're ashamed?
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby The_Essentials » Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:08 pm

crystal_richardson_ wrote:not everyone who commits crimes as psychopaths. many do feel guilt and regret and things like that. sometimes they are urged by circumstances, like family or something, or maybe pressured into it, and end up doing it impulsively or under duress, something they normally wouldn't, and so end up suffering.

other people have like issues. like re rape, sexual addiction or perversion. lots of addicts feel like sh*t after they indulge. it's not just guilt or even at all. it can be low self worth, lots of things. and they may not be devoid of empathy when the 'fever' of the addiction/impulse settles down, after which point they may regret and loath themselves, etc.

it's not pathetic. that's just reality.

why would it please you greatly for someone who showed genuine regret/remorse/empathy to be beaten/raped/etc in prison?

do you have the same trait of which you're ashamed?


I believe people deserve to get what they give to others. Nothing more, nothing less. Balance in all things.

If someone can't handle hearing the impact of their actions, they should have thought about that before taking those actions. If for whatever reason they weren't thinking at the time of their actions, to bad so sad, the victim of their crime can't ever get back what was taken from them, be it their life, butt-virginity, belongings. So why should the criminal be spared the consequences of acknowledging their crime just because they "feel bad" after the fact? That's ridiculous. There's no justice in that. That system enables and promotes the idea that you can commit crimes and never have to pay for what you've done in an equal fashion. How does spending 25 years in a heated/cooled environment where you're fed and have a bed and recreational activities etc but aren't allowed to leave equal taking the life of another person? It doesn't. Our criminal justice system is a joke that protects the criminals.

I've owned everything I've ever done, and I expect others to be able to do the same. Those who can't, or won't, those who hide behind the "I was lost in the fever of addiction, but now I feel bad" are pathetic scum. If you make the bed, you should be able to sleep in it.

Ever heard the line "don't talk the talk if you can't walk the walk" Chris? It's a good one.

The fact that people "feel bad" after doing things only further exemplifies the importance of the victim impact statement in the justice system. These people need to hear what they've done and how it impacted their victims, and it's more important for the victims themselves to get it out so they can have a chance at moving on in their life.

Showing remorse, regret, empathy towards the fact that you killed someone won't bring that person back to life. There's no balance in that. There's no point to that. Just lip service, nothing more.
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby crystal_richardson_ » Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:25 pm

i am not suggesting that they be spared the consequences of their actions, but you are supposing more than that: that they deserve extra punishment.

which just goes against what you're saying, since the empathy/remorse/regret is the RESULT of 'owning it' in these cases, assuming it's genuine

- there are people who genuinely feel no guilt or remorse for these sorts of actions; they are called psychopaths

- there are people who have the capacity to feel guilt/remorse/empathy but block it out with rationalizations like 'i had to rob the store, i was going to starve! the store has lots of food, it can spare some' which appease their conscience which they do have

- and there are people who do things for whatever reason and take full responsibility internally with a fully working conscience; that is they don't rationalize and thus feel awful after, which others may see

i would think the latter are 'owning it' the most. they are owning it when owning it actually means something. like you say it's about balance. the people in the third category will suffer he most assuming they are punished by the system equally as well because they will have to deal with their conscience in addition

so how is that not owning it?

you think people can predict how they'll feel after a long addictive run, a run in which reality becomes progressive obscured to the point where one can no longer make good judgement?

that is the nature of addiction. it is like entering another world slowly, progressively, people transform, reality becomes obscure and you loose the ability to make sound judgement based on awareness of yourself (as you have become obscure to yourself in this alternative world of addiction) and a clear grasp of reality.

everything becomes obscure or crude to the point where you cannot predict how you will feel when that world comes crashing down and years of missteps enter your consciousness with clear eyes. it is like seeing yourself for the time, and what you've done

and so what should a person do at that point? foresee the danger in entering this alternate world to begin with and cease entirely, quit while they are ahead?

but if their choices are indulge the addiction or kill themselves due to depression at not being able to indulge their addition? what if the only other option is death or a life not worth living?

well you might think a sound person would then promptly seek therapy, but easier said then done.


so i think you are ignorant about these people who do these things, not that what i've described describes them all, but i agree with you that they should be judged equally, even if they had some obvious issues.

and if that's too harsh, then i think it's about time society 'owns it' for producing such people since by and large they are not born and if it is wrong on any level to judge them equally to people who weren't in the throws of a legit mental illness but our system can't handle them appropriately as it is then it is a systemic problem

certain things you just can't deal with effectively or justly after the fact. you have to nip it in the bud.
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby crystal_richardson_ » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:32 pm

and on the feasibility of eradicating such issues by 'nipping them in the bud' which some might compare to idealism

we eradicated polio why can't we eradicate this sort of addiction?

it's because it's one of those issues the system doesn't sincerely want to solve, as i talked about in the 'arguing' thread

and given that information, who should own it?

the 'perpetrator' or the system, which includes YOU

you no what'd be interesting? if everyone in a society got a fine for any individual caught and punished for something criminal.

like you'd get it in the mail each time, 500 bucks. that would be interesting lol
Last edited by crystal_richardson_ on Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby Contrast » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:33 pm

This thread is all about victim statements as well
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby crystal_richardson_ » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:36 pm

yes 'all about' that includes what i said
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Re: Victim Impact Statements

Postby Contrast » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:37 pm

What do you have planned tonight crystal?
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