Our partner

What is a psychotic episode?

Schizophrenia message board, open discussion, and online support group.

Moderator: Jasper

What is a psychotic episode?

Postby Ruby3 » Mon Sep 10, 2012 11:10 am

Can someone please explain to me what this is? How it manifests etc?
In Egypt, cats were worshipped as Gods. Cats have never forgotten this.
User avatar
Ruby3
Consumer 0
Consumer 0
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:10 pm
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:41 am
Blog: View Blog (0)


ADVERTISEMENT

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby justjesse » Mon Sep 10, 2012 1:30 pm

Psychosis is a general psychiatry term for a mental state often described as a loss of contact with reality. Hallucinations, delusions and impaired insight may occur during psychosis.

That is just the general definition.

When I have a psychotic episode, I see and hear things that are not really there. The things I see and hear can vary greatly. From simple shadows to fully formed animals/people, or from whispers to loud voices. I of course have more things, but these are the most common. Delusions also occur.
"Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky."

Dx: Bipolar Disorder with Psychotic Features
Borderline Personality Disorder
Social Anxiety Disorder
User avatar
justjesse
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 604
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 1:10 am
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 4:41 am
Blog: View Blog (2)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby Daggerz » Mon Sep 10, 2012 1:57 pm

To add to Ruby's question, could someone with minor schizophrenia (just having imaginary characters and having objects talking to them occasionally) have an unexpected psychotic episode? This would be without the help of drugs or anything like that.
User avatar
Daggerz
Consumer 3
Consumer 3
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2012 1:41 pm
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 4:41 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby Ruby3 » Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:30 pm

It sounds quite un-nerving, T says his voices can make him hurt himself sometimes, and he sees things etc.
In Egypt, cats were worshipped as Gods. Cats have never forgotten this.
User avatar
Ruby3
Consumer 0
Consumer 0
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2012 10:10 pm
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:41 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby AEJ » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:21 am

Psychotic episodes vary from person to person, but it will always feature a hallucination or other factor that distorts reality (my own definition).

Some people may only hear slight sounds or see some small disturbances in their environment. Others may have full blown psychotic breaks, wherein nothing is "real" to these people anymore, and it can severely affect their everyday lives and ability to function.

My typical hallucinations involve objects cracking, being lit on fire, melting like a Dali painting, distorting (as if being looked at through a glass of water), vibrating, or taking on strange features, such as a wall growing hands. I also see grotesque, disturbing creatures and hear voices that range from babbling noises to threats against my life. Not all hallucinations are frightening: I have some that I consider friends and hold dear.

Some people also become delusional or have bizarre thoughts, although this is not always the case. For example, my mind is rational about 80-90% of the time, but yesterday I decided that collecting pine-straw outside my house would make me a millionaire.

And in response to Daggerz question, yes. You are susceptible to having strong hallucinations, even if your schizophrenia or other form of psychotic disorder is only minor. My psychosis started out small, but it eventually grew to the point where it was an almost constant problem that has affected pretty much every aspect of my life. Not trying to scare you, just trying to give you honest answers.
AEJ
Consumer 2
Consumer 2
 
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2012 1:31 am
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 3:41 am
Blog: View Blog (3)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby Frokly » Fri Sep 14, 2012 11:05 am

i think psychosis varies from person to person... but i think would typically involve distortion to reality, and a good degree of dysfunction socially and to daily life depending on severity...

like for me on the other hand the past few weeks i had mild delusions.... though i wouldn't call this psychosis...

psychosis for me based on my experience... would include delusions that control you perception of reality, a complete conviction in those delusions, and the hallucinations which for me was seeing aliens flying down from the sky trying to posses me, fighting them off with my delusions of having powers, seeing mount Olympus in the night sky, and the mythological gods and seeing other things like glimpses of heaven and hell and having theological figures visit me in my room, which one i shall not name to save my head from a platter...

then the more emotional experiences would be the horrifying and enlightening experiences of talking to aliens, dead people like Einstein and having seeing the past from the minds eye and talking to people from the past like Mozart and having you own version of history... like dinasours being a race of powerful psychic beings... and the bermuda triangle being a place where the last of the dinasours reside in another dimension.... man i'm starting to get delusional again... hmm

then you have the deeper stages of psychosis that would involve you taking actions based on these delusions and hallucinations... like driving places... hurting yourself... in ways which i think i should keep to myself... and generally for me was trying to form a utopia and had me looking for people all over the place and walking under the rain wandering the streets, dazed, and confused... hearing voices... and talking to them out loud...

then you have the recovery... which is like being reborn...

there's just too much things to explain but i think for me thats gist of it...

but for me though when it comes to psychosis it's important to remember that some people never recover... i'm just in the lucky group that do...
i was bi-winning too... until my pdoc increase my meds... then i was bi-polar

nobody wants to believe they are insane, everybody wants to believe they are special... so i am normal... which makes me insane
Frokly
Consumer 5
Consumer 5
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2012 11:36 am
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 5:41 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby Givememynameplease » Wed Jan 01, 2014 2:53 pm

A psychotic episode can also be delusions higher or stronger than normal delusions.
Example: if you're diagnosed with psychotic depression, you have hallucinations, and delusions. The delusions are often daily and more often than the hallucinations.
So a psychotic episode can be an episode of hours where your delusional thoughts/beliefs are much stronger than usual, and so strong that you can't tell if they're real. "Normal" delusions, you can often tell that they aren't real even though that doesn't make you any calmer.
A psycotic episode can be both delusions and hallucinations.
Givememynameplease
Consumer 0
Consumer 0
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2013 10:30 pm
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:41 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: What is a psychotic episode?

Postby smithywise » Wed Jan 01, 2014 6:24 pm

Lots of good answers here.

A psychotic episode can be either:

1.) A really noticeable worsening of the person's usual psychotic symptoms, for a person who has some symptoms of psychoses most of the time.

2.) Psychotic symptoms that happen in a person who never has any psychotic symptoms most of the time.

So, in general, say, for a person has schizophrenia, a psychotic episode is a worsening of the symptoms he or she usually has. Instead of talking quietly about the icky things he sees in hallucinations occasionally, and simply saying his hallucinations are distracting and annoying, his hallucinations might get a whole lot more intense and frequent, and he may feel he has to fight them physically.

On the other hand, if a person has severe depression, or bipolar disorder, he or she could have a psychotic episode even though he doesn't have any psychotic symptoms at all, most of the time.

It depends on what a person's 'base line' level of psychotic symptoms actually is - any worsening from that base line is a 'psychotic episode'. And usually the idea of 'psychotic episode' goes along with the person's behavior falling apart - they might fight, or yell, or feel they need to very quickly get somewhere else.

If I totally missed what your question really is, and you're asking about what 'psychotic' really means, it means that the person's feelings, thoughts and senses are being distorted, often by a mental illness. The word 'psychotic' usually appears along with discussions about schizophrenia, as psychosis is a symptom of schizophrenia.

But psychosis can occur in many different illnesses, not just in mental illness. Schizophrenia is, honestly, about the best thing that one can have, if you go looking through all the possible causes, of psychosis. Brain injury, seizures, brain tumors, lupus, dementia, toxic substances, all can cause psychosis. The after-effects of rheumatic fever can cause psychosis - even a high fever can cause psychosis. And there are many others - those are just the ones that I remember right now.

But many of those illnesses are rare, or rare at the age when mental illness often starts. So it's not usually as much of a mystery as to what's causing the psychosis, as it would seem on first glance.

Of course, that isn't the only thing in psychosis. It can also affect thinking. Many people start feeling like they are under a threat. They may get very suspicious - called paranoia. Their thinking may get more 'loose' - so that now they see different connections between ideas. Like the fellow who saw a nurse rushing past and thought of windmills. But psychosis doesn't always mean unpleasant feelings or emotions. Some of it is very pleasant, and may cause some people to not want any treatment.

Too, hallucinations can form from any sensory information - from vision, hearing, touch, pressure, etc. Many people have hallucinations that involve bodily feelings, anything from sexual to pressure, to a 'creepy crawly' feeling under one's skin, to a feeling that someone just pushed or shoved him or her. Sometimes hallucinations also bring specific emotions. That might be fear and anxiety, curiosity, or a 'high' or elated feeling.

My housemate used to sit on the other side of the room near the TV. I'd be reading a book on the other side of the room. Every once in a while he'd look my way with a glare, and say, 'Stop pushing on the top of my head'. I'd reassure him that I wasn't, but he was having a hallucination of pressure on top of his head.

A very common hallucination is of faces. That's because the brain has such a delicate and complicated method for evaluating facial expressions - it involves many parts of the brain that have to coordinate precisely to evaluate a facial expression. Psychosis can really unbalance that process.

What many people with out schizophrenia don't understand, is that these things aren't 'imagined'. The person's brain functions in exactly the same way as when he sees something real. As a neurologist once told me, 'the brain sees it, and also convinces itself that it's real'.

I asked why the brain convinces itself it's real.

He laughed and said, 'Our brains were never designed for deciding something we feel or see or hear, is NOT real. If we feel or see or hear it, it is regarded as real'.

'Let me ask you something', he said. 'Say you went outside, and you looked up, and the sky was grey. What would you think?'

'Point taken', I said, LOL.
smithywise
Consumer 6
Consumer 6
 
Posts: 712
Joined: Sun Nov 03, 2013 11:47 am
Local time: Mon Oct 20, 2014 9:41 am
Blog: View Blog (1)


Return to Schizophrenia Forum




  • Related articles
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Boom Boom and 37 guests

cron