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Difference between ocd and ocpd

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are you confused about the difference?

yes
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no
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I was but not after reading this article
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I was but not after reading this article
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Total votes : 54

Difference between ocd and ocpd

Postby MSBLUE » Mon Sep 13, 2004 3:51 am

ocpd:
DSM IV OCPD Criteria: (Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder)




A pervasive pattern of preoccupation with orderliness, perfectionism, and mental and interpersonal control, at the expense of flexibility, openness, and efficiency, beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, as indicated by four (or more) of the following:

1) is preoccupied with details, rules, lists, order, organization, or schedules to the extent that the major point of the activity is lost.

2) shows perfectionism that interferes with task completion (e.g., is unable to complete a project because his or her own overly strict standards are not met)

3) is excessively devoted to work and productivity to the exclusion of leisure activities and friendships (not accounted for by obvious economic necessity)

4) is overconscientious, scrupulous, and inflexible about matters of morality, ethics, or values (not accounted for by cultural or religious identification)

5) is unable to discard worn-out or worthless objects even when they have no sentimental value

6) is reluctant to delegate tasks or to work with others unless they submit to exactly his or her way of doing things

7) adopts a miserly spending style toward both self and others; money is viewed as something to be hoarded for future catastrophes

8 shows rigidity and stubbornness


OCD criteria:


DSM IV Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Criteria


A. Either obsessions or compulsions:

Obsessions as defined by (1), (2), (3), and (4):

(1) recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced at some time during the disturbance, as intrusive and inappropriate and that cause marked anxiety or distress

(2) the thoughts, impulses, or images are not simply excessive worries about real-life problems

(3) the person attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, impulses, or images, or to neutralize them with some other thought or action

(4) the person recognizes that the obsessional thoughts, impulses, or images are a product of his or her own mind (not imposed from without as in thought insertion)

Compulsions as defined by (1) and (2):

(1) repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) that the person feels driven to perform in response to an obsession, or according to rules that must be applied rigidly

(2) the behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing or reducing distress or preventing some dreaded event or situation; however, these behaviors or mental acts either are not connected in a realistic way with what they are designed to neutralize or prevent or are clearly excessive

B. At some point during the course of the disorder, the person has recognized that the obsessions or compulsions are excessive or unreasonable. Note: This does not apply to children.

C. The obsessions or compulsions cause marked distress, are time consuming (take more than 1 hour a day), or significantly interfere with the person’s normal routine, occupational (or academic) functioning, or usual social activities or relationships.

D. I another Axis I disorder is present, the content of the obsessions or compulsions is not restricted to it (e.g., preoccupation with food in the presence of an Eating Disorder; hair pulling in the presence of Trichotillomania; concern with appearance in the presence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder; preoccupation with drugs in the presence of a Substance Use Disorder; preoccupation with having a serious illness in the presence of Hypochondriasis; preoccupation with sexual urges or fantasies in the presence of a Paraphilia; or guilty ruminations in the presence of Major Depressive Disorder).

E. The disturbance is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or a general medical condition.
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Postby Angel » Mon Sep 13, 2004 3:43 pm

Well....I only fit #s 1, 3, and 6 and yet I was still diagnosed w/ OCPD?!

-Angel
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Postby MSBLUE » Tue Sep 14, 2004 4:42 am

Angel, 1,3,6 of which catagory? ocpd or ocd?



The true difference would be do you have rituals?

OCPD are very rigid with their thinking and think their way is the only way. There are some variables that might seems similiar that only a doc can rule out and some inside criteria and subsx's that are very deep, that only docs and professional know about and the public isn't aware of so that dx care be totally correct without the patient showing sx's by just reading and describing them by what they read. (see facticious disorder and hypocondria)

Those would fall under subcatagories of obsessive disorders associated with ocd. not ocpd
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Postby Angel » Tue Sep 14, 2004 2:19 pm

Hi ddee,

it would be #s 1, 3, and 6 of the OCPD category. I definetly do not feel that my way of thinking is the only way! Usually I'm quick to judge but if someone can show me why they disagree....often times my reply is "wow, I never thought of it that way...you make a good point and I can see that now and agree w/ your view too". Like w/in my home and this intense need to have everything cleaned and neat and organized....I have my way of doing things that I'm comfortable w/ and prefer...but I"m very aware of my issues about things and I know my way is not the only way, the best way or correct way. I just am aware that how I do it is the preferred way for myself. If I'm on the job I can adjust to having to do things in a way I would not prefer to do if the choice were mine to make. At home, well it's my home! So I have the way I prefer to do things and I stick w/ that. But I'm working very hard on ...well for example I have a 3 and 5 yr. old daughters. My 3yr. old loves to help fold towels...of course she does not fold them the way I would...it's hard for me to let her do her thing and not redo it for her when she's done. But I have to remind myself...there is more then one way to fold a towel even if she...or sometimes even my husband for that matter....folds them another way.

I'm very organized. I definetly keep organized lists and so forth to help remind me of things...I can forget easily...so I use an organized way to help me stay on top of things! I clean my house CONSTANTLY. It's not so much that I'm firm on ideas or things ...morals, etc. In that area I feel I hold to my beliefs and thouughts to the same degree any one does. My whole problem is w/ anger/rage issues and a need to keep my house clean to the degree it interferes w/ my doing anything else in my life. I am getting much better as time goes on...but I mean for the longest time I would not leave the house for days at a time....now I'm a stay-at-home mom!...so I mean that I didn't even take my daughters outside to play. They had to wait til my husband got home. I don't get down on the floor and play w/ them. Even now that I've gotten better to a degree I can actually take my daughters outside during the day instead of staying inside working all day long....I don't push them on the swing or play ball w/ them, etc. They play in the yard and I sweep the driveway or brush cobwebs from the siding or prune shrubs or rake (and I HATE yard work)...but I just can't sit still. I feel like I have to be cleaning or keeping up on the house. I don't like to take on things if I feel I can't get them to the level of clean I feel they need to be. I only go so far w/ those type of projects. Now I"m not that rigid w/ everything. If there is a new project at work I had to take on....I did it to the best of my ability. I don't take screw ups or defeat well of course. But mainly the things I avoid if I feel I can't do them to the level of my satisifcation is around my home. I mean I'd get so into having things a certain way I'd cancel plans w/ friends just to stay home and clean. I used to stay up til all hours of the night cleaning even though I'd been at it since 8 in the morning. Now I'm better to a degree where at 8pm after I tuck in my daughters I can stop w/ the cleaning and organizing...that took time and hard work though.

Oh there is so much I could explain. There is a definete pattern dating back to my childhood w/ a need to have things neat and clean that I could detail too. One example...mom said she never minded that I always had to have everything neat and clean...or that I constantly rearranged my bedroom (even as a young child in grade school)...what she minded most was that (in grade school...yes that young) I would be up til 1 in the morning washing my walls! Not because I was worried about germs or anything...I just couldn't rest and I felt I had to clean. Wanted everything neat and clean and organized.

anyway. I'll leave you w/ that! I've been misdiagnosed in the past. The counselor that came up w/ this for me had bounced me from one diagnosis to another the year and a half I worked w/ her. She was my meds counselor. But when she did hit on this; my counselor (therapy) at the time agreed w/ her and so it stood. But often I wonder if OCPD is a true and correct fit or if I should return to counseling (the one I had that agreed had to leave our town and so I've not seen anyone since then...we'd only worked together about 4-5months) and find someone new and see what they think!

Gotta run...thanks for listening! -Angel
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Postby Caitlin23 » Sun Feb 20, 2005 4:32 am

Wow! Thank you for posting that. People think I have OCD, yet I don't really clean my house for fear that the task is too great and it cannot be done "perfectly". I match every one of those criteria. Thank you. I never even knew the disorder existed, thought I was just a perfectionist, or stubborn, or rigid, all of which I am. Note the grammar. lol
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Postby Entangled » Fri Sep 02, 2005 5:48 am

The differences from classes in abnormal pschology show the difference minute. Tho maybe that's changed?

The personal characteristics of OCPD are disabilities that allow you to "Function" in society..usually with a Type A personality including your examples.

OCD is just further along to where you can no longer "Function" in society...basically meaning you can't hold a job or make contributions to society.

Psychologists would term OCPD as people fitting a certain norm...which is the contribution. OCD...people usually are on disability for lack of contribution.

At least that is what I was taught?
This man was sexually assaulted (rape) and has OCD...yikes!

"It literally turned my life around!"

He worked in a Pyschiatric Hospital as a Nursing's Aid for 5 years.

He was also a patient on a few occasions for suicide, too.
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Postby Entangled » Fri Sep 02, 2005 6:02 am

I found a nice little article on OCD...for those who want to know.

http://www.ocfoundation.org/ocf1030a.htm
This man was sexually assaulted (rape) and has OCD...yikes!

"It literally turned my life around!"

He worked in a Pyschiatric Hospital as a Nursing's Aid for 5 years.

He was also a patient on a few occasions for suicide, too.
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Postby Entangled » Fri Sep 02, 2005 6:24 am

well, it does seem to have changed!

This articles seems to help a lot for OCD or OCPD?

http://www.thehealthcenter.info/adult-ocd/ocpd.htm
This man was sexually assaulted (rape) and has OCD...yikes!

"It literally turned my life around!"

He worked in a Pyschiatric Hospital as a Nursing's Aid for 5 years.

He was also a patient on a few occasions for suicide, too.
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Postby sniffles » Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:48 pm

i'm sorry- i still dont get the difference...?!?!?! :?: :!:
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Postby MSBLUE » Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:13 pm

OCD is
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive_ ... e_disorder
( I would have posted all the imfo but it is too long)

OCPD is
    Preoccupation with details, rules, lists, order, organization, bodily functions, or schedules to the extent that the major point of the activity is lost
    Showing perfectionism that interferes with task completion (e.g., is unable to complete a project because his or her own overly strict standards are not met)
    Excessive devotion to work and productivity to the exclusion of leisure activities and friendships (not accounted for by obvious economic necessity)
    Being overconscientious, scrupulous, and inflexible about matters of morality, ethics, or values (not accounted for by cultural or religious identification)
    Inability to discard worn-out or worthless objects even when they have no sentimental value
    Reluctance to delegate tasks or to work with others unless they submit to exactly his or her way of doing things
    Adopting a miserly spending style toward both self and others; money is viewed as something to be hoarded for future catastrophes
    Showing rigidity and stubbornness


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OCPD
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